Wednesday, July 16, 2014
biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver
Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.
Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

biocanvas:

Macrophages in a mouse liver

Found in practically all tissues, macrophages (in blue) are the hungry cells of the immune system. They gobble up dying cells and harmful pathogens like bacteria to ensure tissues are happy and healthy. When a tissue is damaged, young macrophages are recruited by the bucket-load to the site of injury where they mature to speed up wound repair and eat trespassing bacteria. Some bacteria, like the one responsible for tuberculosis, can survive even after being eaten, eventually killing the macrophage and accelerating its spread within the tissue.

Image by Hendrik Herrmann.

Why.

Monday, July 14, 2014

Maybe there’s an exoplanet out in another galaxy somewhere and on it, everything makes perfect, orderly sense. The creatures there live in a completely socialist society, but socialism works because the kinds of things that complicate humanity (e.g. desire for material wealth, power, fame) simply don’t exist. These beings are 100% motivated by instinctual love and kindness. They can have different interests and their own personalities, but every interest is treated in fairness. Like for instance some creatures love cooking and become chefs, some become musicians, some take care of the young, some build houses, etc.. They all work hard at whatever they love and they all trust each other, cause everyone knows that everyone else is a big bundle of kindness and joy. It’s sort of like being a guardian angel and also living amongst millions of guardian angels. Everyone is always looking out for everyone else.

But that doesn’t mean it’s boring at all. It’s actually like one big fiesta cause every day everyone wakes up and goes about their jobs with all the happiness ever, and then they all dance around together and play games with one another and love each other. And they’re also very, very intelligent, and they know all about the existence of life on other planets. They just would never dream of visiting somewhere like planet earth because they’re aware that there are some seriously scary ass aliens over there and they’re perfectly happy just right on their own planet.

sciencefriday:

This cave dweller has no eyes and a ghostly, translucent shell.

lizdevine:

NYC storm

Last week there was a big crazy storm that rolled through New York, I got obsessed with capturing a photo of lightening. The sky turned amazing colors and I ran out to the Manhattan bridge and managed to get a few shots. But after seeing everyone’s photos the next day from the storm I have decided to retire as a lightning photographer. 

July 2014

Wednesday, July 9, 2014
My third grade teacher called my mother and said, ‘Ms. Cox, your son is going to end up in New Orleans in a dress if we don’t get him into therapy.’ And wouldn’t you know, just last week I spoke at Tulane University, and I wore a LOVELY green and black dress. Laverne Cox, speaking at the University of Kentucky (via mcgonagirl)

(Source: so-nyeo-shi-daze)

whitehouse:

“It’s a good thing when nobody who works full-time is living in poverty. That’s not un-American. That’s not radical. It’s right. It’s what built this country.” —President Obama in Denver on expanding opportunity

mysteryforeverunsolved:

If you don’t love Evanna Lynch there’s something wrong with you

mysteryforeverunsolved:

If you don’t love Evanna Lynch there’s something wrong with you

Saturday, July 5, 2014

wnycradiolab:

nubbsgalore:

coloured scanning electron microscopy by steve gschmeissner (and sixth photo by nicole ottawa). an electron microscope uses a particle beam of electrons, which have much shorter wavelenghts than photons (visible light) and produce a greatly magnified image of the illuminated specimen (up to 10 million times).

dyk: the tardigrade, or water bear, seen in the last photo, can survive in temperatures of one degree kelvin and tolerate pressures six times that of the deepest oceans. despite preferring simple ground dirt, these creatures (which aren’t technically extremophiles) were shown in one experiment to have survived ten days in the vacuum of space. they can also endure heavy doses of radiation and hibernate for a decade. 

dy-also-k: the maggots of the bluebottle fly (the goofy looking dude in the first photo), are used medicinally to clean wounds. once sterilized, they are placed in a wound where they feed on dead tissue and leave healthy tissue untouched. their saliva contains anti bacterial chemicals which maintain sterility in the area.  

click pic for a description of other photos. see also: previous microscopy posts

OK, I’m just gonna say what I’m thinking here: TINY CONFUSED WALRUS.